2017 Snoqualmie Tribe Economic Impact Study

In May of 2017, the Snoqualmie Tribe released its first Economic Impact Study which analyzed the Tribe’s impact on the Snoqualmie Valley community.

 

“The Snoqualmie Tribe’s operations do not exist in economic isolation

the Tribe’s payroll and vendor outlays have a large economic and fiscal impact on the area.”

 

Brief Findings

“As reservations have become more economically dynamic, nearby non-Indian communities have benefitted – both the trading partners who provide workers, goods, and services to reservations and the governing partners who coordinate the regional provision of public goods and services with tribal governments.

 

Snoqualmie’s status as a recognized and organized sovereign government bolsters its economic impact. Its enterprise income is government revenue, giving the Tribe a vested interest in the economic stability of the region.”

 

 

“The Snoqualmie Tribe is a regional export engine. More than 80% of the Casino’s slot machine revenue recorded in the player loyalty club comes from outside Snoqualmie Valley.

Only 5% of that revenue comes from North Bend and Snoqualmie, compared with 39% coming from Seattle, Bellevue, and Renton.”

“In fiscal year 2015, the Snoqualmie Tribe employed over 1,700 workers in their government, casino, and store operations, making it one of Snoqualmie Valley’s major employers.”
“The Snoqualmie Tribe’s gross regional product impact includes tax impacts caused when purchases and payroll ripple through the state-taxable economy. Snoqualmie Tribe activity yielded estimated taxes of $33.4 million in the Snoqualmie Valley Study Region, $38.4 million in King County, and $44.9 million statewide in 2015.”
“Between 2010 and 2015, the Snoqualmie Tribe gave $5.3 million to local nonprofits, spanning domains as diverse as health, youth and family, the environment, the arts, and public broadcasting.

The Tribe has directed nearly 25% of its contributions to organizations in or near the Snoqualmie Valley.”

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About the AuthorĀ 

Jonathan B. Taylor is an economist with expertise in natural resources, gaming, and American Indian development. He is President of the Taylor Policy Group, an economic and public policy consultancy; Research Fellow at the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development; and Associate at the Native Nations Institute at the University of Arizona.